Tree services can be confusing, especially if you don’t know the difference between cutting down, trimming, and pruning trees. When should each approach be used? And what, exactly, does it mean when they tell you they’re going to do aggressive tree pruning on your property? 

In this guide, you’ll learn all about the difference between cutting down and trimming trees, so you can make sure your tree cutting services will do exactly what you want with your trees. This information is presented by our team at Clearwater Tree Removal Services. Reach out to our company for additional information or to schedule services.

What is Tree Cutting?

Tree cutting services refer to eliminating trees from a particular area, usually because they’re deemed hazardous and will otherwise pose a danger to people or property. The process of tree cutting services involves several steps including evaluation, calculation, and execution; it may also be necessary to hire different professionals for each step of service, though some companies offer all-inclusive packages that include tree cutting services from start to finish.

Trees are cut down all the time for a number of different reasons. For example, if they’re dead or dying, they may be deemed hazardous and need to be removed; if they’re blocking power lines or property lines, they may need to be removed; if they’re too close to a home or business, there may be concerns about falling branches or damage caused by winds. Other times trees are cut down because they have grown too large and obstruct views; in other cases, homeowners simply want them gone because they don’t like their appearance. 

What is Tree Trimming?

While trimming trees may seem like a basic job, it actually involves more than just taking an angle grinder to branches and letting them drop to the ground. A tree trimmer must take into account several factors before and during a tree trimming project, including safety, aesthetics, the health of your tree, height restrictions, and best practices.

Before a tree trimming project can begin, it’s important to assess its health and identify any underlying conditions or diseases that may be contributing to poor growth or development. The goals of a tree trimming project are usually simple: maintain healthy branches and protect limbs from breakage during harsh weather or natural disasters like tornadoes, hurricanes, hail storms, and ice storms. This can be achieved through pruning branches at their correct angles when they’re young so that tree growth continues uninterrupted as it matures into adulthood.

While there are several methods of tree trimming available, each has its own strengths and weaknesses, as well as its own purposes and limitations. The type of tree you’re trimming also plays a major role in determining which technique is best to use during your project, so keep that in mind as you compare and contrast your options.

DIY vs Professionals

When it comes to tree cutting and trimming, there are two camps of people – those who DIY and those who pay for professionals. And yes, we’re aware that’s a bit of an oversimplification – but let’s look at what you get when you hire a professional versus doing it yourself. First off, hiring a pro means you don’t have to buy all sorts of equipment or spend hours learning how to safely cut down or trim trees. That said if you want something done right – and done quickly – hiring pros may be your best bet. The average cost of removing a tree can cost between $200 and $2,000. The cost has a number of factors like the size and location of the tree.

While DIY will save you money, if you aren’t experienced with tree trimming and removal it may be best to call in the pros. Inexperienced tree trimmers can lead to unnecessary injuries and damage to your property. Here are some things that are important when deciding whether or not to hire a professional:

  • Do you have enough space to work? If not, then they’ll need to bring in equipment like a crane or bucket truck which can add hundreds of dollars to your final bill. 
  • Do you have any safety concerns about doing it yourself? 
  • Do you have all the necessary equipment?
  • Do you have to remove a lot of trees, or just one? If it’s just one, do you have room for it to be removed as well as chipped and taken away? 
  • Are there any other things in your yard that could be damaged by dropping branches on them – like fences or sidewalks? These are all questions to ask yourself before hiring a professional.

After answering all these questions, you may start to see why hiring someone is the better choice. Once you’ve decided you won’t be doing it, the next question is who should you call to do it?

How To Pick A Professional Company

If you are getting a professional tree service to come out and trim or cut down your trees, be sure that you know what they will and won’t do before they get there. The last thing you want is for them to trim all of your trees, only to realize that your pine tree in front of your neighbor’s house should have been cut down instead because it was invading their yard.

Here are some questions you should ask them to make sure that your trees stay healthy and look great for years to come: Will they offer a written estimate? What services do they provide, and will they be using all necessary tools like ropes, pruning shears, or chainsaws to do so? When will they perform work in my yard and when can I expect to see it done? Will they haul away the tree or branches? How many tree projects do they do per week and what’s their cancellation policy in case of bad weather or other emergencies? What kinds of payment options do they accept and how long will it take for me to get my money back if I decide not to go through with it after signing a contract?

As you can see there are a lot of questions to ask before hiring someone for your tree cutting services. Once you get these answers though you’ll have a clear picture of who to go with. It’s important that you feel comfortable and trust your tree service company because they will be on your property for several hours working on your trees. Make sure that they will do what they say, when they say it, and how much they say it will cost.